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Monday, January 21, 2013

Research recently posted on Facebook

More research linking TBI with excessive sleep
Watson, N.F., Dikmen, S., Machamer, J., Doherty, M., Temkin, N. (2007) Hypersomnia following traumatic brain injury. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 3(4). pp 363-368. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1978314/pdf/jcsm.3.4.363.pdf
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A review of research relating brain injuries to sleep disturbance
Orff, H.J., Ayalon, L., Drummond, S.P.A. (2009). Traumatic brain injury and sleep disturbance: A review of current research. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. 24(3). pp 155-165. Retrieved from http://www.nursingcenter.com/pdf.asp?AID=863002
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An article that links narcolepsy with brain injury
Baumann, C.R., Bassetti, C.L., Valko, P.O., Haybaeck, J., Keller, M., Clark, E., Stocker, R., Tolnay, M., Scammell, T.E. (2009). Loss of hypocretin (orexin) neurons with traumatic brain injury. Annals of Neurology. 66(4). pp 555-559. DOI: 10.1002/ana.21836. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2770195/pdf/nihms151446.pdf
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Abstract: Chronic, daytime sleepiness is a major, disabling symptom for many patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), but thus far, its etiology is not well understood. Extensive loss of the hypothalamic neurons that produce the wake-promoting neuropeptide hypocretin (orexin) causes the severe sleepiness of narcolepsy, and partial loss of these cells may contribute to the sleepiness of Parkinson’s disease and other disorders. We have found that the number of hypocretin neurons is significantly reduced in patients with severe TBI. This observation highlights the often overlooked hypothalamic injury in TBI and provides new insights into the causes of chronic sleepiness in patients with TBI.

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